We’re igniting a movement that’s changing the way Canada addresses issues of food insecurity, poor health, and social isolation in low-income communities. We’ve come a long way in three short years. Here’s a snapshot of how we’ve grown to reach more than a 100,000 people each year.

Annual Program Survey results

In 2015, we interviewed 400 adult participants at five Community Food Centres — The Local, The Table, NorWest Co-op, The Stop, and Regent Park — as part of our Annual Program Survey. Together these surveys help us to better understand program outcomes in areas such as healthy food access, knowledge, skills and behaviours, social inclusion and civic engagement. They also provide the opportunity for participants to make suggestions for improvement to programs in order to maximize the social impact the Community Food Centres create. Adult and youth participants also completed written and verbal evaluations in many programs such as community kitchens, community gardens and after school programs. Together these surveys help us to better understand program outcomes in areas such as healthy food access, knowledge, skills and behaviours, social inclusion and civic engagement, and provide the opportunity for participants to make suggestions for improvement to programs in order to maximize the social impact the Community Food Centres create. For detailed information on each centre’s individual statistics and survey results, please see the 2015 Annual Impact Summary Reports posted on our website at cfccanada.ca.

Total Surveys Completed
125 // The Stop
74 // Regent Park
74 // The Table
71 // NorWest Co-op
56 // The Local

INCREASING ACCESS TO HEALTHY FOOD

Community Food Centres aim to increase access to healthy food for low-income community members in a respectful and dignified manner through programs like nutritious community meals and affordable produce markets.

0%
of respondents identify their Community Food Centre as an important source of healthy food

IMPROVING HEALTHY FOOD BEHAVIOURS & PHYSICAL HEALTH

Community Food Centres strive to improve knowledge, skills and behaviours around healthy food by offering community kitchens, community gardens, perinatal nutrition programs and after-school programs.

0%
have made healthy changes to their diets
0%
have started eating more fruits and vegetables
0%
have noticed improvements in their physical health

INCREASING SOCIAL INCLUSION AND IMPROVING MENTAL HEALTH

Community Food Centres aim to reduce social isolation and increase participants’ connection to a variety of supports. They provide dignified environments that welcome people regardless of circumstance and provide multiple new ways to participate, volunteer and become engaged in the life of the community.

0%
have noticed improvements in their mental health
0%
have made new friends at their Community Food Centre
0%
feel they belong to a community at their Community Food Centre

INCREASING CIVIC ENGAGEMENT

Community Food Centres train community members with lived experience of poverty and marginalization to become peer advocates and help community members in need by connecting them to resources and available supports. In 2015, 70 people graduated from a twelve-week Community Action Training course that offers a way for people to become informed about big-picture issues and feel better equipped to take action. Social justice clubs empower people to be leaders and to join peer organizations in pushing for lasting change.

0%
of people surveyed say they feel differently about poverty and hunger issues since they became involved in the Community Food Centre
Photo Credits (From the top down)
  1. Ikoro Huggins-Warner, courtesy of Regent Park CFC.
  2. Janine Kropla, courtesy of NorWest Co-op CFC.
  3. Terry Manzo, courtesy of The Local CFC.
  4. David Zimmerly, courtesy of The Table CFC.
  5. Zoe Alexopoulos, courtesy of The Stop CFC