Community Food Centres Canada strives to provide a coordinated response to the serious issues of food insecurity, poor health, and social isolation affecting many low-income communities. This is how we do it.

Build & Support

We provide stable funding, resources, and a proven program model to local partner organizations so they can launch responsive and impact-driven Community Food Centres.

Lead

We provide training, leadership and transformation grants to a national network of community food security organizations engaged in grassroots work across the country.

Convene

We convene leaders in the food, health, farming, hospitality, business, nonprofit, and other sectors to work together for change.

Speak Out

We speak out on issues facing our food system, and push for policies that can create positive changes in the health and well-being of Canadians.
The issues we face

Household food insecurity

More than four million Canadians are food insecure, unable to access stable supplies of food.3 The severity of the problem can range from people worrying about running out of food, to parents skipping meals so their kids can eat, to people going entire days without eating.

Diet-related illness and poor health

Poverty and food insecurity are closely linked to poorer health outcomes and increased rates of chronic conditions.4 For example, rates of type 2 diabetes are 4.14 times higher in the lowest income group than in the highest.5

Social isolation and disengagement

Canadians living on low incomes are more likely to report having fair to poor mental health than those in higher income groups.6 They’re also more likely to report feeling socially isolated from their communities.7

Our Approach
Our Impact

Healthier people & communities

Program participants experience improved physical and mental health, develop new friendships, find support and connection, and work together for change.

Stronger community organizations

Sharing best practices and resources enhances the capacity of organizations working in the community food sector and makes the case that an investment in good food matters.

Better policy

More engaged individuals and organizational voices press for systems-level change.